One of the great benefits to skin rolling is it increases the circulation in the area to which it was applied. Often times, areas that are tight or restricted are receiving reduced blood flow and oxygen. By bringing blood flow to the area, toxins can be cleared and the healing contents of the blood are brought to the injured area. Skin rolling can also restore the mobility of surrounding joints and nerves, which can help to restore normal function. By allowing the skin to move more freely, pelvic congestion, heaviness and aching can be effectively treated.
Look in a mirror if lying down doesn't work. If you are a guy, the lying on your back method for locating your pelvic floor muscles may not work. An alternative is for you to stand in front of a mirror naked. Look at your body as you attempt to flex your pelvic floor muscles. If you are contracting the muscles correctly, you should be able to see your penis and scrotum lift up. When you relax your pelvic floor, you should see these parts drift back down.[4]
Squats: Squats are a great holistic exercise because they engage many muscles at once. To do a body-weight squat, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, then slowly bend your knees, dropping your hips and glutes down and back, keeping your back straight, as if you’re sitting down on a chair. (You can place your hands on your hips or stretch them out in front of you for balance.) Bend your knees until your thighs are parallel with the floor, then return to an upright position. Repeat 10 times, up to three times per day.

Look in a mirror if lying down doesn't work. If you are a guy, the lying on your back method for locating your pelvic floor muscles may not work. An alternative is for you to stand in front of a mirror naked. Look at your body as you attempt to flex your pelvic floor muscles. If you are contracting the muscles correctly, you should be able to see your penis and scrotum lift up. When you relax your pelvic floor, you should see these parts drift back down.[4]

It is essential that we, as pelvic floor physical therapists, also include other assessments when we are examining our patients for the very first time. We employ the tried and true physical therapy exam practices to determine if there is an underlying condition elsewhere in your body, such as a strength deficit or alignment issue that could be affecting your pelvic floor. It’s wild to think of it, but something as seemingly unrelated as a flat foot or a hip injury can be enough to set off pelvic and abdominal pain!


If you’re dealing with pelvic pain, Kotarinos recommends researching the International Pelvic Pain Society or the American Physical Therapy Association to find a qualified pelvic floor physical therapist. (You can also see your PCP for a referral.) Dr. Huang also suggests focusing on your health holistically, with things like stress management, regular exercise, and a well-balanced diet. “We want to educate and empower women to be in control,” she says.
If you’re dealing with pelvic pain, Kotarinos recommends researching the International Pelvic Pain Society or the American Physical Therapy Association to find a qualified pelvic floor physical therapist. (You can also see your PCP for a referral.) Dr. Huang also suggests focusing on your health holistically, with things like stress management, regular exercise, and a well-balanced diet. “We want to educate and empower women to be in control,” she says.
Hip bridges: Engage your abdominals and pelvic floor before you start to bridge up, then bring the hipbones up to the sky. Then hollow out even more and really engage the pelvic floor. Then slowly lower your back to the mat, starting with your upper back, middle back, then lower back. Once you reach the mat, you can release your pelvic floor, and then re-engage as you do this move again.
Kelly is a certified Personal Trainer with NASM, a Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher, and has her B.S. in Kinesiology from San Diego State University. She is co-owner of Roaming Yogi Adventures, a yoga and adventure-based retreat. She believes that having fun and well-rounded exercise is the key to maximizing strength, flexibility, and mental health.
The pelvic floor is a group of muscles--in both men and women--that support your spine, help control your bladder, and help with sexual functions. By identifying your pelvic floor, performing Kegels (a popular pelvic floor exercise), and practicing other pelvic floor exercises, you can rehabilitate these muscles. In time, you can gain the benefits of a strong pelvic floor, including reduced urinary incontinence, less back pain, more control of your core, and better sex.
Pelvic floor exercises are specific movements that engage and strengthen your pelvic floor muscles, which can weaken due to factors such as childbirth, aging, menopause, obesity, chronic coughing, or heavy lifting. Most pelvic floor exercises don’t require specific equipment. These exercises typically rely on your body’s weight to initiate the stretch and engage the muscles. Pelvic floor exercises can increase bladder control, reduce the probability of pelvic organ prolapse, and increase sexual pleasure.
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